Lower Queen

201432-lower-queen-main-590.jpg“When the Yonge Subway began operating from Eglinton Station to Union on March 30, 1954, a hollowed-out cavern beneath Queen Station waited for a subway that never came. When the TTC went to the Toronto residents on January 1, 1946 with a referendum on its subway proposal, there were two lines being voted upon. The first was the Yonge line we know today, running from Union Station, up Yonge Street to the northern terminal at Eglinton. The east-west line was to be a streetcar-subway through which Queen and other streetcars would duck beneath Queen Street traffic from Trinity Park to Logan Avenue. Torontonians approved this plan overwhelmingly and this is the plan that the TTC built to when it started work on the Yonge Subway in 1949. … By the 1950s, plans for the Queen called for the line to be built as a full-fledged subway instead of a underground streetcar operation. At the same time, the TTC was noticing that suburban traffic was increasing on Bloor Street and Danforth Avenue, and that the Bloor streetcar’s capacity was being taxed far more than the Queen car’s. As a result, in the late 1950s, the TTC made the controversial decision of building the east-west line along Bloor Street. The rest, as they say, is history.” – Toronto’s Lost Subway Stations

Became the base of operations for Desmond Kell in Aftermath 5

Lower Queen

Risen barnumyay